a huge thank you

On Friday 6th July we held our 3rd annual Community History Showcase at GMCVO St Thomas’s, Ardwick. A huge thanks once again to everyone who contributed;  the event could not have happened without your input which is hugely valued and appreciated.

4 speakers shared the challenges and achievements of their projects through illustrated talks:

Women from Dynamic Support also mounted a wonderful display of printed and embroidered textiles. The group are currently in the planning stages of their own heritage project exploring African culture and traditions.

This year’s audience of 36 included heritage professionals from local museums and archives, as well as participants from at least 10 community projects. Louise Sutherland and Antonia Canal from the Heritage Lottery Fund also attended to offer advice and support on project ideas and to hear current participants’ experiences.

A group consultation exercise raised the following topics, amongst others: the difficulties of locating and applying for relevant project funds; the challenges of making research accessible (when it has been collected in a community language); the importance of recognising and challenging colonial narratives in museum and archive collections.

The [Forgotten Soldiers] project was a way of rechanneling my anger into something visible and structured. I was able to reclaim something of my Muslim heritage whilst also saying ‘This is what my family has contributed to British Society’.

Adil Mohammed Javid, Alchemy Arts

We were very pleased to welcome Mrs Fatima Begum to this year’s event. Fatima is the mother of Ahmed Iqbal Ullah, after whom the AIUET is named and founder of the Ahmed Iqbal Memorial High School in Bangladesh. She was delighted to hear about the variety of heritage projects currently taking place and the aim of ‘Coming In From The Cold’ to help raise their long-term visibility.

We also said a fond farewell to Jackie Ould, Director of the AIUET and founder of the annual community showcase event. Jackie retires this summer after almost 20 years of continuous involvement with the organisation. Thank you so much, Jackie for all the work you have done to champion BAME-heritage in Manchester.

3rd Annual Community History Showcase

Friday 6th July from 1:30 – 4:30pm 

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The Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Education Trust is hosting this year’s event in partnership with the Manchester BME Network (& supported by the Greater Manchester BME Network) at: St Thomas Centre, Ardwick Green North, Manchester M12 6FZ. 

The showcase is an opportunity to meet and chat to people from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic organisations delivering heritage projects in Greater Manchester. Find out what’s happening in your area and share information, learning and contacts.

The Education Trust will reimburse transport costs for participating groups and provide drinks throughout the afternoon. Set-up is from 12.30pm.

If you would like to attend, book a table or for any other enquiries about the day please contact laila.benhaida@manchester.ac.uk

 

Jo Robson appointed Archivist

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As the newly appointed Archivist of the ‘Coming in from the Cold’ project, I am excited to be working with BAME communities to help them to understand and develop archive collections as part of their HLF projects. My first few weeks have been quite a whirl wind and have included becoming acquainted with the Centre’s existing archive collections, managing a volunteer, attending meetings and spreading the word about CIFTC, getting to know the team better, and preparing for the start of our Archive Trainee (who you will hear from in an upcoming blog).

Continue reading “Jo Robson appointed Archivist”

Talking Heritage

Drew Ellery our digital officer recently attended the Heritage Soapbox event at Hoxton Hall, London. The event, planned by the Heritage Lottery Fund’s youth advisory group welcomed young people to share and celebrate heritage, as well as discuss how the sector can support them better. The main themes of the event were participation, training and early career development.

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Image courtesy of @HoxtonHall

Drew presented a talk to around 60 delegates on the importance of paid opportunities into the heritage sector, especially for young people coming from diverse backgrounds. Drew also spoke about the impact of seeing collections that were representative of his identity at Archives+, driving his passion to work within the archive sector. This was a great opportunity for him to talk about his current  role as the digital officer of ‘Coming in from the Cold’, encouraging better representation of BAME communities within archive collections.

Drew Ellery appointed as Digital Officer

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Photo of Drew Ellery taken by Daniella Carrington.

As the newly appointed Digital Officer of the ‘Coming in from the Cold’ project, I am excited to be championing the representation of BAME communities within archive collections. I have had a busy first few weeks attending meetings with the Heritage Lottery Fund, spreading the word about CIFTC at community heritage events, and most importantly getting to know the team a little better. Continue reading “Drew Ellery appointed as Digital Officer”

what is an archive?

We currently have two postgraduate students from the Institute for Cultural Practices (ICP) at the University of Manchester on a placement with us.  They have been investigating the value of historic documents and how to encourage further deposits from local BAME communities as part of the CIFTC project. Today Naomi Weaver and Yang Li were busy interviewing our long-time friend and trustee, Nigel de Noronha in various locations around Central Library as part of a project to demystify the archive. Nigel was once a member of the Asian Youth Movement (AYM) and also contributed to the Macdonald Inquiry, so features prominently in a number of records we hold. He is now a Teaching Fellow in Sociology at the University of Warwick.

During his interview, Nigel reflected on both the experience of encountering representations of himself as a young activist and on the value of being able to examine such collections as an academic researcher.

By creating a short film with a range of contributors, Naomi and Yang hope to address basic questions about what’s in our collection, how it ended up here and to whom it might be of interest in future years. Watch this space for the final edit, which we hope to share with you soon…